Growing Up Special

Parents of Special Needs and Adopted Children Seeking Excellence

Posts Tagged ‘relationships’

Apr
14

Include Me Please

By Rainy on April 14th, 2010

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     When you are raising special needs children you know how painful it can be for your child to be excluded from other children and their activities.  Sometimes your child’s challenges prohibit them from sharing an activity or experience that other children around them enjoy…but other times, it is either through prejudice or mis-information…or, a lack of understanding.  No matter the reason, being excluded is not fun and can actually be harmful to your child’s self-esteem and their ability to form positive social interative relationships.   Therefore, teaching how to accept and include others is a huge life lesson for families, schools, churches, organizations and agencies.

       That is why i love the book called, The Friendship Puzzle.  The children’s book is all about helping children to learn about the importance of accepting and including kids who are living with autism.   It talks about differences and how friendships are formed once we understand each other.  We have to learn to look beyond the surface of who a person appears to be different from ourselves; to see the real them.  Then, we must find ways to include each other in our daily lives for a chance to become friends.    Sometimes it is easy to misunderstand another person’s actions when we don’t understand why they do or say certain things; or, behave in a different way. 

       The Friendship Puzzle was written by Julie L. Coe and illustrated by Sondra l. Brassel.  The book was inspired by Jennifer Maloni  who’s children Dominic and Dylan are living with autism.  The boys experienced a similar real life experience that was sad and disappointing.  That experience is used in this book to make a difference in how we view people with disabilities.   You can learn more about the book and where to purchase it here:  http://www.friendshippuzzle.com/  This is not an affiliate link… it is just a book that I happen to adore. 

        That message, of accepting and including one another, is very profound.  We can all apply that message in multiple ways to better the relationships we have with others without regard to abilities or disabilities; it is something that we can all improve on.  This book and a recent news piece on an amusement park for those who are disabled reminded me of how often people neglect to include those who are different from ourselves in the things we enjoy; simply out of ignorance of how to do it.

        The amusement park I read about is called Morgans Wonderland and it is in San Antonio, Texas.  It was built by a father after a failed attempt by his daughter Morgan to interact in play with other children due to her disabilities and the lack of clear communication between the children alongside of a pool.  The other children were playing with a beach ball and she wanted to play too…but lack of communication and understanding prevented continued play.  This kind of situation can be heartbreaking…but in this case it was the catalyst he needed to dream of a place where special needs people and their families and caregivers could come and be included in all of the activities. 

        Gordon Hartman was the father and he has achieved his dream.  Morgans Wonderland is a 25 acre park that lets the special need individual be themselves and experience the joy of an amusement park just like anyone else.  They utilize volunteers at their park and they encourage families to come and enjoy their time together.  I love the idea behind this park.   If you are interested in learning more about Morgan’s Wonderland and all it has to offer…please click here: http://www.morganswonderland.com/morgans-wonderland-tell-us-about-inclusion.asp  Again, this is not an affiliate link…it is just a place where a family can go to relax and have a positive family experience with their special needs loved one. 

        I just want to thank the Gordon Hartman’s and the Julie Coe’s of this world who realize the importance of acceptance and inclusion. 

Aug
01

Sign Language To Communicate And Strengthen Relationships

By Rainy on August 1st, 2009

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I’ve had the recent pleasure of “meeting” an extra-ordinary person with a calling on her life to teach communication skills through sign language to families.  Louise Sattler is a very interesting person who has had a variety of experiences in different settings, including the educational field where she was a licensed school psychologist, which has enabled her to work with children and their families to develop strong and effective communication skills.

I met Louise through an online contest, believe it or not.  It was run on Twitter.  I happen to have won a poetry contest; and the prize, that I chose, was a DVD that made by Louise Sattler.   Louise has a site called:  http://www.signingfamilies.com/ . There you will find all kinds of information about Louise and what she does; but, I didn’t know all of that, when I won the DVD.

I chose that DVD because of the title and what I could potentially use it for.  The title is, “Baby, Toddler, and Preschool Sign Language”.   I work with children in several capacities and I liked the idea of learning some sign language just in case I needed to know it in the future.  I was so excited when i got the DVD because, just watching it I could see the passion and the commitment that Louise had for teaching sign language to children and their families.

Bravery came over me and I approached Louise about doing an interview with me so that I could blog about what she does through her workshops, her speaking engagements and through her DVD’s.   Louise agreed to do that and I thought that I would share the news of what she does because it helps so many people.  By teaching sign language as a way of communicating it allows families to be more effective in advocating for their special needs loved ones.

http://www.signingfamilies.com/ caters to those who live and work with individuals with special education needs.  Signing isn’t just for the deaf communities…people who struggle with many issues of disability can benefit from communicating through sign language.   So if you work in education, in health- care, daycare, foster care, adoption, or you have a business or a family member who is impacted…this is a great way to brush up your communication skills so that you can strengthen your ability to communicate effectively in your relationships.

If you would like to contact Louise Sattler about her programs & her work she can be reached at Louise@SigningFamilies.com; or, you can contact her to do a workshop, give an interview or a presentation by calling her business line at:               410-715-9647       .    Louise is also on Twitter: http://twitter.com/Louiseasl . She is very down to earth and she also teaches in Spanish-she is bi-lingual.  Ask her about her programs….tell her that Writewhereyouare sent you and you will get a discount.  :)   You can purchase her DVD’s at her site:  http://www.SigningFamilies.com/  or here on Amazon. com: http://bit.ly/913i5/

Ps.

  You can always stop by and see me also at:  http://www.writewhereyouareblog.com/ .

Oct
13

Various Written Perspectives On Raising Special Needs Children

By Rainy on October 13th, 2008

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        I have been reading a book called, Love You To Pieces.  It is a collection of written pieces on raising special needs children; some pieces are true and some are fiction.  It is a book rooted in real life challenges facing parents of special needs children.  It is not a Hallmark moment kind of book filled with false illusions of perfection. 

         Every family that faces issues in raising special needs children finds themselves learning how to do it in a way that is workable for their particular family.  No one can go to a doctor or a website and find a perfect way of coping that is workable for each and every person in that situation.  There is often no right way to do it.  Many times in raising our children we have to learn as we go.  Sometimes what worked the day before no longer works and we must adjust our technique.

         This book showcases the emotional and the practical side of parenting challenged children.  It is real and gut wrenching and truthful.  The physical difficulties that parents face as their special needs child grows and their abilities do not.  The doctor appointments that reveal multiple challenges that were unexpected.  The public perceptions that both hinder and inspire progress.  Siblings that are supportive and friends and relatives that are not.  Relationships that support each other and relationships that flounder under the strain.  Moments of denial and acceptance.   Judgements and advice by people who have no real idea of what it takes to raise a special needs child successfully.   Parenting is a strange mixture of courage and fear…searching for answers that we are sometimes unwilling to accept.  These are issues that we all find ourselves in when parenting special needs children.

           Often times, parents of special needs children feel isolated.  It is a fine balance of looking for opportunities to socialize and educate our children in environments that will impose no further harm or damage upon our children.  This book is a validation of so many issues, that we face, that it is somewhat comforting to know that we are not alone in our struggles.  It is a book worth reading.  It was written by Suzanne Kamata who is a fiction writer for an online magazine, Literary Mama.  The publisher is Beacon Press; their website is:  www.beacon.org and the book was copyrighted in 2008

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